Validation and Refinement of Scalable Protocol for Neuronal Differentiation of Human iPSCs

May 17th 2017

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential to differentiate into any cell type of the human body, making them an interesing tool for studying disease.

Use of iPSCs is especially promising in the fields of neurodevelopment and neurological diseases due to the difficulties associated with obtaining tissue samples from patients. These cells also have potenial in the development of more efficacious and physiologically relevant toxicity tests and drug screening models to replace cell line based techniques; their three dimensional culture also offers an opportunity to bridge the gap between two dimensional in vitro culture and in vivo models, possibly leading to a reduction in animal experimentation.

The aim of this study, in association with Fraunhofer UK, was to validate and refine a published protocol for neuronal differentiation using three dimensional aggregates, and to make the protocol easily scalable through the use of a benchtop bioreactor.

The findings, detailed in our poster presentaion, validate a published protocol for neuronal differentiation and confirm the suitability of the BioLevitatorâ„¢ bioreactor system for the production and maintenance of human iPSC spheroids, as well as their subsequent differentiaton. The BioLevitatorâ„¢ system allows rapid expansion of spheroids neuronal differentiation on a potentially large scale.

Further refinement of this system is likely to allow efficient and reproducible production of human iPSC derived neuronal progenitors for applications such as toxicity testing and drug screening. The additional possibility of using diseased iPSC lines in this system further reinforces its potential.

For details of workflow, results and conclusions, please view our Poster PDF.

This poster was published in association with Fraunhofer UK and the work was part funded by the European Bank for induced pluripotent Stem Cells (EBiSC).

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